Day 3 Part 1 – Siem Reap – Cambodia – 23rd Jan 2012

Our third day in Siem Reap was a chance to take a break from the Angkor Archaeological Park and see a bit more of Siem Reap itself.

First thing is that we took the opportunity to sleep in – much appreciated by the girls. So it was at 10am we headed off to the Silk Farm, a half hour Tuk Tuk ride in the opposite direction to the temples, so we got to see more of the countryside.

There were conflicting reports about visiting the silk farm however we really enjoyed it. You follow the product cycle through all the way and so it gave a great insight for us and the kids.

 

Silk worms eating Mulberry leaves and then making cocoons…

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Boiling the cocoon to kill the grub and then initial spinning of the cocoon…the outer shell of the cocoon provides softer but not as fine silk…this is separated from the inner shell which provides much finer silk…make sure you ask to eat the silk worm grub…juicy inside with a nutty taste…

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Spinning the silk the…manual and then machine…

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Dying by hand using natural dyes…

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Weaving…people from local villages are trained over 6 months…they specialise in one pattern…monthly pay is US$150…when I enquired on this our guide was quick to tell us that the women weavers (and one man) are from local villages and they have the ability to work over time to earn more…he also mentioned the farm is French owned but over 20% of the profits go back to the Government for investment in Cambodia…personally I thought he was too quick with this information and 20% is pathetic…

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One Response to Day 3 Part 1 – Siem Reap – Cambodia – 23rd Jan 2012

  1. Jack Elliott says:

    Very neat. We raised silk worms in grade school. There was a huge mulberry tree behind our classroom and we fed the worms its leaves. I remember being so fascinated with the cocoons and holding them small treasures. To this day I still like them in a funny sort of Tom Sawyer-keep-a-pocket-full-of-trinkets sort of way.

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